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Conflict, Transitions and Resilience

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CHALLENGES IN THE MAGHREB AND MASHREQ

2nd July at Scotland House, 6 Rond-Point Schuman, Brussels
Joint Closed Seminar by Centre for Global Security and Governance (University of Aberdeen), European Centre for International Affairs, Brehon Advisory

Public and Private sector stakeholders from Member States met in a closed meeting to discuss the relationship between conflict and transition in the Mediterranean and the Middle East, focusing on the delicate transitions in Tunisia and Egypt, and conflict in Syria. Participants analysed and discussed policy options for donors and governments in the face of ongoing turmoil.

This
 workshop
 brought together
 policy‐makers,
 stakeholders
 and
 academics
 to
 explore
 the
 roots,
 possible
 trajectories,
 and
 long‐run
 policy
 implications
 of
 the
 Arab
 Uprisings
 with
 specific 
focusing 
on
 three 
core 
issues:

  1. Resilience:
 What
 role
 do
 institutions
 and
 economic
 policy
 play
 in
 supporting
 and
 sustaining
 societal
 resilience?
 What
 roles
 can
 internal
 actors
 play
 in
 combining
 security,
 stability,
 development,
 and
 democracy
 policies 
to
 achieve 
resilience?
  2. External
 Actors’
 Roles:
 How
 can
 private
 intervention
 (for‐
 and
 non‐ profit)
 and
 government
 policy
 increase
 the
 likelihood
 of
 orderly
 transitions
 towards
 more 
resilient 
societies?
  3. Avoiding
 Blowback:
 How
 can
 the
 risks
 of
 ‘backslide’
 best
 be
 managed?
 How
 can 
blowback 
be
 avoided?

The
 workshop
 has considered how
 the
 challenges
 these
 issues
 pose
 vary
 across
 specific
 MENA
 contexts,
 with
 particular
 respect
 to
 three
 categories
 of
 political
 systems:
 1.
 ‘post‐populist
 republics’
 (Egypt,
 Tunisia,
 Yemen),
 2.
 deeply
 divided
 societies
 (Syria,
 Lebanon,
 Libya)
 and
 3.
 states
 in
 which
 protests
 have
 been
 muted.

The
 Workshop
 has been
 closed
 and
 held
 under
 ‘Chatham
 House
 Rules’,
 i.e.
 comments 
made 
are
 never 
for
 attribution
 unless
 otherwise
 specified.

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